Artwork Inspired by Neil Gaiman's American Gods

Artwork inspired by Neil Gaiman's American Gods


Of everything Neil Gaiman has written, American Gods remains among my favorites. A milestone of my high school years, it played a large role in shaping my views of the world and what hides beneath it all. In the book, Gaiman explores the existence of gods in modern times versus the glory and exaltation they were given eons before. The plot stretches far beyond such a simple explanation, as is the way with much of Neil Gaiman‘s writing.


If you haven’t read American Gods (or even if you haven’t read American Gods recently), it’s a book worth picking up again, even if just to catch all the details that slid from your brain since last year when you read it for the third time. If you aren’t convinced, I have a feeling a few of the illustrations below might just put you in the mood.


Some of the pieces depict actual scenes from the book while others are loose adaptations or interpretations. If there are some you don’t understand fully (I’m guilty of this myself), it truly is time to pick the book up again. The good news is that the 10th Anniversary Edition has just come out, “newly updated and expanded with the author’s preferred text”. You can pick it up in Hardcover, for your Kindle or for your nook.


Sean Hartter:
Artwork inspired by Neil Gaiman's American Gods


Simon Wilches. Buy it here.


Artwork inspired by Neil Gaiman's American Gods


Derek Charm:
Artwork inspired by Neil Gaiman's American Gods


Mike Henderson:
Artwork inspired by Neil Gaiman's American Gods


Paul Maybury:
Artwork inspired by Neil Gaiman's American Gods


These are just a few of my favorites, but the full gallery can be seen over at SuperPunch.


Source – Neil Gaiman’s Journal via SuperPunch

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